Why a web design really takes six weeks

Here’s an example of why a web design normally takes about six weeks to complete.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Day 1


web design
Work on design concept.
Day 2


web design
Complete concept, submit to client, request revisions.
Day 3


waiting on client
Day 4


waiting on client
Follow up with client about revisions.
Day 5


waiting on client
@4:58 pm
Finally hear back from client. Instead of the trio of white, navy blue, and light blue on the concept, they would like you to “see if you can try purple, zebra stripes, and leopard print” instead. After trying your best to talk them out of it, you sigh and accept the sad reality which is your life.
Day 6


relaxing
Day 7


relaxing
Day 8


web design
Swap nice colors with horrible colors. Resubmit concept to client.
Day 9


waiting on client
Day 10


waiting on client
Day 11


waiting on client
@4:59 pm
Client calls, saying they had a meeting and that the new colors are out. Instead of admitting they were wrong, client suggests a mix of white, navy blue, and “baby blue”.
Day 12


relaxing
Resubmit original concept to client from day 2. Client loves it! You compliment their artistic vision, and thank them for their helpful suggestion.
Day 13


relaxing
Day 14


relaxing
Day 15


website development
Begin site development
Day 16


website development
Complete site development, just need content from client. Remind client that you are still waiting on content.
Day 17


waiting on client
Day 18


waiting on client
@4:57 pm
Client can’t be bothered about content right now, apparently there was a meeting and they aren’t happy with a part of the design.
Day 19


web design argument
Reply to client that it will cost extra to make that change since the development is already complete. Begin heated e-mail exchange.
Day 20


web design argument
Day 21


web design argument
Day 22


web design argument
Day 23


web design argument
Day 24


web design argument
Day 25


web development agreement
After seven days of arguing via e-mail, you decide to let them off the hook “just this once”. After all, you DO want to get paid… and the client said he “didn’t understand all that technical mumbo-jumbo” anyway.
Day 26


web design
Change concept to new client specifications. Resubmit.
Day 27


relaxing
Day 28


relaxing
Day 29


waiting on client
Day 30


waiting on client
Day 31


waiting on client
Day 32


waiting on client
Day 33


waiting on client
@4:59
Client, in exhausted voice, says “I guess it looks ok”.
Day 34


relaxing
Day 35


relaxing
Day 36


website development
Change previously-fully-developed site to match new approved design. This “simple change” pretty much requires the entire site to be re-coded.
Day 37


website development
Complete new development, submit to client for approval.
Day 38


waiting on client
Remind client that you are waiting on approval. Also politely let him know that you need the content ASAP.
Day 39


waiting on client
@4:58pm
E-mail from client reads: “Website looks decent. Still working on that content”.
Day 40


waiting on client
Day 41


waiting on client
@7:23pm
You receive an e-mail from client. Attached is a .jpg image with all the text and images you need. That’s right, it’s in a jpg. You won’t be cutting or pasting tonight.
Day 42


website development
@3:30pm
Wow, that was a long day but you finally got all the content into the site, laid out perfectly. Resubmit to client for approval.
Day 43


funny web design
@Midnight
Receive an e-mail from the client which reads: “Make it Live already! Also, I want a discount since you guys were late!”

If you enjoyed this article, please take a look at our other web design articles.

Jeff Couret (Founder/Developer – WebNola)

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Web Analytics